Publications

What it is Heavy Fuel Oil? And why is is bad?

What is Heavy Fuel Oil? And why is it bad?

The use of heavy fuel oil by ships crossing the Arctic creates the risk of a catastrophic spill – which would be practically impossible to clean up. Worse still, when heavy fuel oil (HFO ) is burned in ship’s engines, the black carbon emitted falls onto Arctic snow or ice.

The need for urgent action to stop the use of blended very low sulphur fuels leading to increases in ship-source Black Carbon globally

MEPC 75/5/5: The need for urgent action to stop the use of blended very low sulphur fuels leading to increases in ship-source Black Carbon globally

This document, submitted to MEPC75 by FOEI, WWF, Pacific Environment and CSC  responds to a recent study showing that new blended low sulphur residual fuels designed to meet the IMO 2020 mandated 0.50% global sulphur limit will result in very significant increases in ships’ Black Carbon emissions, reflects on the implications of this for shipping’s contribution to the climate crisis and calls on IMO to regulate to stop their use.

The need for an urgent switch to distillates for ships operating in the Arctic

MEPC 75/5/4: Air Pollution Prevention – The need for an urgent switch to distillates for ships operating in the Arctic

This document, submitted to MEPC75 by Submitted by FOEI, WWF, Pacific Environment and CSC discusses the implications for the Arctic of a recent study indicating that blended low sulphur residual fuels that have been developed to meet the IMO 2020 sulphur limit requirement will result in a significant increase in Black Carbon emissions, and calls on IMO to mandate an urgent switch to distillates for ships operating in the Arctic to avoid a sharp rise in emissions of short-lived climate forcers in this vulnerable area

Infographic: The Use of Heavy Fuel Oil in Arctic Shipping

Infographic: The Use of Heavy Fuel Oil in Arctic Shipping

This infographic details how many ship operating in the Arctic use heavy fuel oil (HFO) – the residual waste of the petroleum refining process. It is extremely viscous and virtually impossible to clean up in the case of a spill. It also looks at Black Carbon, a critical contributor to human-induced climate warming, especially in the Arctic. The combustion of heavy fuel oil produces high levels of Black Carbon.

Infographic: How Can We Reduce Black Carbon Emissions From International Shipping?

Infographic: How Can We Reduce Black Carbon Emissions From International Shipping?

To address the impact of ship Black Carbon (BC) emissions on the Arctic, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) has been tasked with developing a definition for black carbon, deciding on best methodology for measuring black carbon, and identifying abatement options. A considerable number of black carbon abatement options exist with varying reduction potential of BC emissions. Some are readily available, some in development, some expensive, some cheaper. This infographic goes through some of the most effective abatement options and depicts their advantages and drawbacks based on the most up to date scientific literature.

PPR 7/8/3: The need for an urgent switch to distillates for ships operating in the Arctic

PPR 7/8/3: The need for an urgent switch to distillates for ships operating in the Arctic

Submitted by to PPR7/8 by FOEI, WWF, Pacific Environment and CSC. This document discusses the implications for the Arctic of a recent study indicating that blended low sulphur residual fuels that have been developed to meet the IMO 2020 requirement will result in a significant increases in Black Carbon emissions, and calls on the IMO to mandate an urgent switch to distillates for ships operating in the Arctic to avoid a sharp rise in emissions of short-lived climate forcers in this vulnerable area.Download document (pdf): PPR 7/8/3: The need for an urgent switch to distillates for ships operating in the Arctic

Comments on document PPR 7/14/4, "Draft language for a ban of use and carriage of heavy fuel oil as fuel by ships in Arctic waters"

PPR 7/14/6: Comments on document PPR 7/14/4, “Draft language for a ban of use and carriage of heavy fuel oil as fuel by ships in Arctic waters”

This document sets out the views of the co-sponsors on document PPR 7/14/4, “Draft language for a ban of use and carriage of heavy fuel oil as fuel by ships in Arctic waters”. The co-sponsors support the process outlined in document PPR 7/14/4 but do not agree that delays or exemptions to a ban are necessary.